Graduate students interested in my research program should contact me at mmendez@wcs.org.

Sarah Stellick (PhD student)

Sarah is broadly interested in the conservation of threatened odontocetes. Her current research involves determining the environmental influence on disease susceptibility in dolphins by examining variability at the major histocompatibility complex class II loci among Franciscana dolphin populations. Ultimately, her goal is to support conservation efforts with genetic studies. She has a master’s degree in marine science from the University of South Carolina where she worked on the characterization of the upper respiratory tract microbiome of Atlantic bottlenose dolphins through metagenomic analyses. She is currently working on her PhD in ecology at Fordham University working with Dr. Sergios-Orestis Kolokotronis and myself.

Francine Kershaw (PhD student, graduated)

Francine is interested in developing methodologies that integrate behavioral, environmental, and genetic data to quantify the ecological processes underlying evolutionary patterns. She is also interested in how this information can be applied within the policy arena to develop effective mechanisms for conservation and management. She successfully completed her Doctoral Dissertation at the Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Department, Columbia University, where I have served as a member in her Dissertation Committee for her research on humpback whale conservation genetics. Francine has engaged in "side projects" outside the marine domain to fullfil her varied interests - one such example is her research on niche modeling of yellow anacondas, which she first authored as a paper in Diversity and Distributions

Evan McCartney-Melstad (MA student, graduated)

Evan is interested in the use of molecular approaches to conservation at different organizational and spatial levels. He successfully completed his Masters Thesis on Yellow Anaconda Conservation Genetics under my supervision at the Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Department, Columbia University, and first-authored an associated publication with a group of collaborators and myself in PLoS ONE

Nathan Fedrizzi (MA student, graduated)

Nathan is interested in seahorse conservation and successfully completed his Master's Thesis on population structure of Florida Seahorse populations under my supervision at the Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology Department, Columbia University.

 

Photo: Samborombon Bay, Buenos Aires, Argentina (© Martin Mendez)